Summertime on Plum Island – Time for Renewal

It’s been quite a long while since my last post. It was certainly a chilling winter.  A surge of storms brought significant loss of homes, properties, and of the Plum Island coastline.  I don’t have to write about the bad news; if you are interested in what happened, all you have to do is search online for “Plum Island storm damage” and you’ll find it.  As a resident, it became difficult to publicly chronicle such devastation but just like the sun rising every day, nature and people alike begin to heal and rebuild. The New England summer has been a hot one. July temperatures have reached upper 90’s sending flocks of people to Plum Island’s beaches to cool off. Tourists fill the local restaurants. Vacationers in search of a memory just have to look to the sky each evening as the glorious sun sets to the west over the great marsh, and to the north for bedazzling fireworks from neighboring Salisbury Beach each Saturday night. It’s a low key vibe on Plum Island.  Eclectic and laid back, Plum Island offers people looking for not-your-typical “Cape” like destination.  Strolling on the beach is a favorite past time. And this year the sand bar just north of the center beach is back.  At low tide, meander out there and feel like you’re walking on water! As the dog days of summer continue on and August brings September, the island continues it’s renewal and readies itself for the next season of change.  Come discover Plum Island, if only for a day and see what I...

Blizzard ‘Nemo’ Hammers Plum Island

The blizzard of 2013, aka ‘Storm Nemo’ blanketed the greater Boston area with over two feet of snow. Plum Island, barely recouping from Hurricane Sandy, which eroded beach dunes so significantly as to put 4 homes on Annapolis Way in danger of falling into the ocean, got hit again hard. Astronomically high tides this morning sent 15′ waves crashing on shore and had no mercy on the beach, continuing to erode the sand and dunes from center beach south. Boston Globe posted pictures on its Facebook page of some of the damaged...

Another stormy night batters the coastline

December comes roaring in with old man winter.  Even though winter hasn’t officially started, strong wind and rain batters Plum Island tonight.  While I sit comfortable and cozy with a glowing fire in the fireplace, I know that outside, the newly replenished beach is getting pummeled.   Living on the island, one has to get used to the power of the wind.  There is nothing to stop or slow down the wind, especially wind blowing from the east. It comes rushing across the atlantic, sometimes with a vengeance, sometimes with ease.  There are no trees, no land, to absorb its fierceness until it reaches this barrier island.  The same reason many migrating birds find refuge on their pathway south Weather forecast for tomorrow? 45 and sunny. Condition of the beach? To be...
Why Live on an Island?

Why Live on an Island?

Having just returned from visiting a friend on Martha’s Vineyard this past week, I started wondering what is it that attracts certain people to make an island their home.  A good friend of mine purchased a townhouse in Vineyard Haven some time ago with the original intent for it to be an investment property. It’s evolved into a more permanent type of year-round residence and she’s loving it!  There are drawbacks, of course, as anyone who had been to the Vineyard can attest that it’s not easy to get there.  Hours in the car, a majority of that stuck in traffic.  Waiting for the ferry. The inflated costs.  The hordes of tourists during peak season…. The tourists invasion can be a bit overwhelming, particularly for local residents trying to get through the day-to-day.  On the other end of the spectrum, when the tourist are gone, and the vacation-home owners have returned to their semi-permanent homes, the island can be a bit isolating.  One can find the solitude just as overwhelming as the crowds… Are the misconceptions, trials and tribulations of island living the same no matter what the island? On Plum Island, we don’t have some of the problems mentioned earlier.  It is easily accessible by causeway. No ferries, (even though that was the only way to the island long ago…) just drive on over.  As for the crowds, yes, we get our share of tourists, but not the tens of thousands that flock to the Cape and the Islands. Ability to navigate The small island is 2/3rds nature preserve, also further restrictive with its narrow and sometimes dead-end streets and limited...